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Movement Disorders: specialties

Diseases

Some of the main diseases treated in the Movement Disorder Unit include: 

Syndrome of Tourette and tics

This causes repetitive involuntary noises or movements. It is characterised by a combination of motor or phonic tics and, in some cases, behavioural and psychiatric disorders.

It is not covered by public health

Isolated, complex and combined dystonia

Involuntary twisting movements, abnormal posture, paralysis and disability. In children, this may be due to problems during birth, or it may be metabolic or genetic in origin.

It is not covered by public health

Neurodegenerative diseases with brain iron accumulation (NBIA)

Genetic diseases associated with excessive accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia. They cause dystonia and other progressive neurological disorders.

It is not covered by public health

Paroxysmal movement disorders

Rapid and unexpected onset and short duration. These are due to dysfunction in the synaptic proteins or channels that regulate the neurotransmitters. They may be associated with migraine or epilepsy.

It is not covered by public health

Acquired, immune or genetic chorea

Chorea is an involuntary, irregular and discontinuous movement. We treat rheumatic chorea (the most common in children) and those associated with neurodegenerative, metabolic and genetic diseases.

It is not covered by public health

Tremor

This may be isolated or associated with other neurological disorders. The cause of the tremor will determine the possible treatment. There are exaggerated physiological, essential, cerebellar and parkinsonian tremors.

It is not covered by public health

Early-onset Parkinsonism

This is quite rare and presents muscle stiffness, bradykinesia or slow movements, tremor and instability. It is usually genetic and normally responds to pharmacological treatment.

It is not covered by public health

Treatments

The therapies we offer include the following: 

Botulinum toxin infiltration

Transient-effect therapy (from 4 to 6 months) based on the use of one of the most potent known neurotoxins. It is injected into muscles affected by dystonia and spasticity.

It is not covered by public health

Neuromodulation

Localised electrical stimulation of the brain to inhibit the anomalous neuronal discharges that cause the disorder. The aim is to improve motor function. The clinical effect is reversible.

It is not covered by public health

Baclofen pump

Therapy based on the intrathecal administration of a muscle relaxant. Indicated for patients with spasticity or dystonia who do not respond to oral medication.

It is not covered by public health

Psychological treatment for Tourette’s syndrome

We use specific behavioural therapies and we monitor other associated psychiatric disorders.

It is not covered by public health

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